Whole Food Nutrition https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au Whole Food For Life Wed, 02 Oct 2019 05:36:45 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 https://i1.wp.com/www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/cropped-appletouch.jpg?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 Whole Food Nutrition https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au 32 32 114873131 My Simple Top 5 Tips to Reduce Anxiety https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/my-simple-top-5-tips-to-reduce-anxiety/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/my-simple-top-5-tips-to-reduce-anxiety/#respond Wed, 02 Oct 2019 05:36:34 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=122735 The post My Simple Top 5 Tips to Reduce Anxiety appeared first on Whole Food Nutrition.

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  1. Eat protein with every meal

Protein or amino acids are essential for the production of neurotransmitters (brain chemicals).   Serotonin is a well-known one.  Protein also keeps you full for longer and avoids those blood sugar dips which can contribute to anxiety.

Foods:  lean red and white meat, fish, tofu, oats, nuts, seeds, eggs, wholegrains, dairy, legumes

  1. Eat regularly

This means breakfast, lunch, dinner with snacks in-between.  If this sounds tricky, eat smaller portions.  By eating regularly, you’ll be balancing your blood sugar levels which will make you calmer and less anxious.

  1. Reduce/cut out caffeine and energy drinks

Caffeine is stimulating so it will increase your anxiety.  If the thought of reducing or cutting out caffeine is too daunting, reduce it gradually.  For example, if you have 3 coffees each day, have 2 coffees each day for a week and the following week, have 1 coffee each day.  Cold turkey doesn’t always work!

  1. Stop eating sugar

I know what you’re thinking, ‘No way am I cutting out sugar!’  There are too many reasons to list here as to why sugar is harmful but in terms of anxiety, here goes:

Blood sugar balance – as mentioned previously, keeping blood sugar levels balanced is essential.  When you eat refined sugar, your blood sugar is like a rollercoaster and when that rollercoaster falls, you feel irritable, anxious and nervous.  You also want to eat more, right?  Refined sugar has no nutrients except for glucose which you need for energy but that energy is short-lived.  Again, you experience energy dips.  Next time you eat sugar, monitor how you feel.  Yes, you get a quick burst of euphoria but then you feel crap again when the rollercoaster falls.

  1. Food sensitivities

 Do you react differently to different foods but not sure which foods are causing those niggly feelings?  Food sensitivities cause even more inflammation which you don’t need when anxious.  Think of the gut brain connection.  Certain foods and drink that you consume can cause a reaction, which ultimately affect your brain.  Not sure which foods/drinks?  Contact me here to find out more https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/contact/

     

     

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    The gut-brain axis and your mental well-being https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/the-gut-brain-axis-and-your-mental-well-being/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/the-gut-brain-axis-and-your-mental-well-being/#respond Mon, 17 Jun 2019 01:50:26 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=120664 Gut health is closely connected with anxiety, depression and other neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Affective disorders, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and chronic pain.  Your gut is your second brain via the gut-brain axis.  It is a bidirectional link between the central nervous system (CNS) and the enteric nervous system (ENS) of […]

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    Gut health is closely connected with anxiety, depression and other neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Affective disorders, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and chronic pain. 

    Your gut is your second brain via the gut-brain axis.  It is a bidirectional link between the central nervous system (CNS) and the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the body.  This occurs primarily through neuroimmune and neuroendocrine mechanisms, often involving the vagus nerve.  This communication is dictated by what’s going on in your gut.  For example, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) are part of this communication process and they are the main source of energy for the cells lining your colon.  You can find SCFA’s in fibre rich foods such as fruit, vegetables and legumes and in foods containing resistant starch such as cooled potatoes, rice and pasta.

    Don’t forget that the gut-brain axis is a two-way communication highway.  If you have anxiety and/depression or chronic stress, this is going to have an impact on your gut (signals from your brain to your gut) and the health of your gut is going to have an impact on your brain (signals from your gut to your brain). 

    What are the signs of an imbalanced gut microbiome?

    • Irritable and moody.
    • Interrupted sleep.
    • Allergies, intolerances and/or food sensitivities.
    • Difficulty in losing weight.
    • Depression and/or anxiety.
    • Behavioural issues.
    • Low energy and fatigued.
    • A ‘foggy’ brain.
    • Hormones out of whack.
    • Constipation, acid reflux, diarrhoea, bloating.
    • Skin conditions.

    Stress

    Given how closely the gut and brain interact, it becomes easier to understand why you might feel nauseated before giving a presentation or feel intestinal pain during times of stress.  Stress (or depression or other psychological factors) can affect movement and contractions of the gut, make inflammation worse, or perhaps make you more susceptible to infection.

    There is strong evidence that exposure to stress may be responsible for the dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, thus leading to the different diseases of the gut. What can you do about it?  Repair your gut and de-stress!

    Repair your gut

    You can start by removing the following:

    • Common reactive foods – usually dairy, eggs, gluten.  If you’re not sure which foods don’t suit you and don’t want to follow a strict Elimination Diet, click on the link for more information about the Biocompatability Hair Test which tests for 500 foods, personal care and household products that you may be reacting to https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/product/bio-compatibility-hair-analysis/
    • Refined carbohydrates and sugar
    • Artificial sweeteners
    • Unhealthy fats
    • Additives and preservatives
    • Environmental toxins
    • Excess caffeine/alcohol
    • Unnecessary medications
    • Chronic stress

    To help with reducing stress, treat yourself and have a massage.  If this isn’t your thing, go for a walk, try a yoga class, chat with a friend.  It doesn’t have to be complicated.  Do anything that you enjoy and it’s away from work and home.

    If you need help with improving the health of your gut and your mental wellbeing, contact me for a complimentary 20 minute chat at sal@wholefoodnutrition.com.au or 0412 370321 or click here to book an initial consultation https://wholefoodnutrition.youcanbook.me/.

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    Living with anxiety in the family – an update https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/living-with-anxiety-in-the-family-an-update/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/living-with-anxiety-in-the-family-an-update/#comments Mon, 29 Apr 2019 02:30:45 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=120565 A year ago, I wrote about how anxiety was affecting my daughter and my family.  I received wonderful and touching messages about how it resonated with so many people.   I would love to be able to say that my daughter, now 17, is back at school full time and is leading a ‘normal teenage’ life […]

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    A year ago, I wrote about how anxiety was affecting my daughter and my family.  I received wonderful and touching messages about how it resonated with so many people.   I would love to be able to say that my daughter, now 17, is back at school full time and is leading a ‘normal teenage’ life but the opposite is true.  For most of the last year, we have focused on improving the anxiety (not her anxiety) and she has taken a break from school.  Her second attempt at school this year didn’t work out.  She desperately wanted it to work because she wanted to learn and make new friends.  As a mother, it is heartbreaking to see your child suffer like this but it was taking a toll on my health.  This year, I am focusing on myself.  If I’m not well, how can I look after my family?  As mothers, we need to put ourselves first and sadly, I don’t see this very often in my clinic.

    The anxiety rollercoaster at home has forced me to think about my own childhood and adolescence.  People have asked me did I have anxiety when I was younger and the answer was always no.  Now that I’m familiar to this type of behaviour, I now realize that I did have anxiety in one form or another.  The words ‘anxiety’ and ‘depression’ were never discussed when I was growing up.  We were just told to get on with it and not talk about our feelings and emotions.  From my 20’s, I noticed something was wrong when, in group situations, I would freeze, go red and have palpitations.  Never, ever, did I think it was anxiety.  This affected my working life in that I couldn’t speak in meetings.  Frustrating and embarrassing.  It is only now that I am older, hopefully wiser and run my business that I can’t hide anymore.   The thought of public speaking filled me with dread and I would get palpitations just thinking about it.  The passion for sharing my knowledge and educating people about health and nutrition far outweighed the negative aspects of public speaking.  Getting out of my comfort zone was the best thing that happened and I now absolutely love it.  Sure, I still get nervous and there is still room for improvement but to get up in front of a group of strangers and speak is an achievement in itself.

    Initially, I didn’t want to share this update.  My thoughts included, ‘people are going to think we’re weird’ or ‘how can her daughter not go to school!’ and masses of judgement but you know what, she’s not the only one.  Each week, I hear of another adolescent suffering with anxiety, depression and even suicide.  Many of them are not going to school either.  How did it get to this?  Maybe that’s for another blog!  In one word – pressure.  Masses of extra-curricular activities, homework, exams, tests.  Social media, gaming, social isolation, bullying, body image, world events and many other factors make up the big picture.  There is huge pressure on our children and teenagers to be ‘perfect’ in every way.  These words are based on my opinion but you only have to look at the statistics to see that anxiety and depression are on the rise, particularly in young adults.

    As a Nutritionist, I focus on diet, lifestyle, biochemical and genetic imbalances and nutrient deficiencies.  For someone who suffers from a mental illness, it can be hard for them to eat healthily.  When we feel good and aren’t stressed, we tend to eat healthy foods.  If we’ve had a bad day, we tend to reach for the unhealthy food and/or alcohol.  For someone with anxiety, this stress is switched on constantly and all they want to do is either not eat at all or eat unhealthy foods.  I see this with my daughter and this is why it is so important to assess the person’s lifestyle and environment.  It’s not all about diet!  My daughter is now trying to find a part time job (stressful in itself).  Getting out of the house and being in a different environment will help her immensely.  We keep our fingers crossed.

    Whole Food Nutrition has changed direction this year and I am proud to say that I now specialize in gut health, mental health and preventative health.  The focus is on diet, lifestyle, biochemical and genetic imbalances, toxicity and nutrient deficiencies.   My daughter and so many people like her have inspired me to follow the mental health and well-being path.

    If you’re not part of the Whole Food Nutrition community and would like to know more about nutrients, tips and foods to improve your mental wellbeing, click here https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/subscribe/ to download your FREE ‘A-Z of Mental Well-being’.

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    Don’t play guessing games with your health https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/dont-play-guessing-games-with-your-health/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/dont-play-guessing-games-with-your-health/#respond Thu, 13 Sep 2018 04:30:46 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=120560 Have you spent years trying to sort out a specific health condition and getting nowhere? This happened to me.  I had insomnia for years, my life was too busy and I ended up with adrenal fatigue.  I also didn’t realise that I was very depleted in most minerals which was having a significant effect on […]

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    Have you spent years trying to sort out a specific health condition and getting nowhere?

    This happened to me.  I had insomnia for years, my life was too busy and I ended up with adrenal fatigue.  I also didn’t realise that I was very depleted in most minerals which was having a significant effect on my health.   So how did I find out?  Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis.

    Why test for minerals?

    Minerals are essential for growth, healing, vitality and wellbeing.  They provide structural support in bones and teeth and they maintain the body’s acid-base balance, water balance, nerve conduction, muscle contractions and enzyme functions.  Minerals participate in almost every metabolic process in the body – they are the true ‘spark-plugs’ of life.

    Ideally we should get all the minerals we need from a balanced diet.  Unfortunately, this is rarely possible in today’s world.  Modern farming techniques, fertilisers and depleted soils reduce the mineral content of foods.  Environmental toxins, chemical food additives and stressful lifestyles also have a detrimental effect on our nutritional status.  Consequently, we need to test and monitor our nutritional needs more than ever.

    Causes of Mineral Imbalances

    • Poor eating habits
    • Stress
    • Medications
    • Pollution
    • Genetic and individual factors
    • Nutritional supplements (excess and deficiency)

    Any of these relate to you?  I’m guessing they do.  The test is so easy, all you do is give a sample of your hair and that’s it, sit back and wait for the results.

    Message me now if you want to get started on your path to good health and feel amazing.

     

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    One of these tips could help you with depression https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/one-of-these-tips-could-help-you-with-depression/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/one-of-these-tips-could-help-you-with-depression/#respond Wed, 15 Aug 2018 04:05:53 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=120548 Most of us have felt depressed at some stage in our lives.  But what if your depression is serious and stops you from living life to the full? The holistic way of treating depression or any mental health condition is to look at the whole person.  What are they eating, what do they do in […]

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    Most of us have felt depressed at some stage in our lives.  But what if your depression is serious and stops you from living life to the full?

    The holistic way of treating depression or any mental health condition is to look at the whole person.  What are they eating, what do they do in their spare time, what work do they do, what social connections do they have and the list goes on.

    When seeking help, most people think of a psychologist/counsellor or perhaps a kinesiologist or healer.  A nutritionist looks at the person’s diet first and foremost but also looks at what is contributing towards the depression in the first place.  Here are some of the factors:

    • Blood sugar imbalances
    • Poor gut function
    • Food intolerances/allergies
    • Hormone imbalances
    • Stress, insomnia
    • Nutrient deficiencies
    • Obesity, inflammation
    • Unresolved emotional thoughts
    • Neurotransmitter imbalance
    • Heavy metal toxicity
    • Lifestyle – exercise, work, school, lack of sunlight, gaming, social media
    • Biochemical/physiological imbalances

    Here are MY top 5 tips for helping with depression:

    1.  Diet

    A wide and varied diet is really important but if that’s too challenging, make sure you eat these foods:

    Vegetables – packed full of antioxidants and other essential nutrients.  For example, green leafy vegetables are full of folate and B vitamins, needed for good brain function.  Most people don’t eat enough veggies.  As well as adding steamed veggies to your dinner, add spinach to a smoothie, left-overs for lunch and veggie sticks with a dip such as hummus.

    Omega 3 – oily fish such as mackerel and sardines, mackerel, walnuts, flaxseeds, avocado. 

    B vitamins – vital for the production of our neurotransmitters (brain chemicals).  Include wholegrains (brown rice, brown basmati rice, quinoa, buckwheat, oats, amaranth, millet), meat, nuts, seeds, green leafy veggies, bananas, legumes, lentils in your diet.

    Protein – without protein, we can’t produce our neurotransmitters which are essential for healthy nervous system function.  Also great for balancing hormones.   Protein rich foods include meat, dairy, legumes, nuts, seeds, eggs, tofu, tempeh.

    I know I’m stating the obvious but try to avoid refined carbohydrates and sugar as much as you can.

    2.  Gut Health

    Gut health is closely connected with depression.  Your gut is your second brain via the gut-brain axis.  A healthy diet is essential but you could have an imbalance in good and bad bacteria or you may not be absorbing nutrients sufficiently.

    3.  Sunlight

    A good dose of Vitamin D always lifts your mood but it also affects your melatonin production.  Try to get sunlight in the morning.  It’s also a good idea to get your Vitamin D levels checked.

    4.  Lifestyle

    Do you exercise or get out for a walk in the park?  Exercise is top of the list for helping with depression but it’s not always easy to get motivated, right?  Do it with a friend or join a group class.  Both will keep you motivated.

    A walk in the park will do wonders for your mental health.  Research has shown that green spaces have a positive impact on mental health.

    5.  Get Help

    If you think you may have depression or you have been diagnosed, there is always support out there.  Nutrition plays a part in the mental health jigsaw, along with psychological therapies.  Get help today.

     

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    Alcohol, weight and calories https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/alcohol-weight-and-calories/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/alcohol-weight-and-calories/#respond Mon, 18 Jun 2018 05:10:00 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=120518 I’m not here to preach to you how much alcohol you should drink each day/week.  I’m also not here to talk about the short and long term negative aspects of drinking alcohol.  If you’d like to find out more about that, click on this link http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/mentalhealth/Factsheets/Pages/alcohol.aspx My philosophy at Whole Food Nutrition is a way […]

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    I’m not here to preach to you how much alcohol you should drink each day/week.  I’m also not here to talk about the short and long term negative aspects of drinking alcohol.  If you’d like to find out more about that, click on this link http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/mentalhealth/Factsheets/Pages/alcohol.aspx

    My philosophy at Whole Food Nutrition is a way of eating for life so I don’t count calories but when it comes to weight management, some of us need to look at how many calories/kilojoules we’re consuming.  You’d be surprised at how it all adds up.  I think in calories so have added them here and also added soft drinks.

     

    Beverage

     

    kJs

     

    calories

    Dark spirits
    Jim Beam Black Label & Cola Cans 375mL 1099 263
    Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey & Cola Cans 375mL 1069 255
    Bundaberg U.P. Rum & Cola Cans 375mL 998 238
    Wild Turkey Bourbon & Cola Cans 375mL 977 233
    Johnnie Walker Red Label & Cola Cans 375mL 971 232
    Light spirits
    Smirnoff Ice Double Black Cans 6.5% 375mL 1069 255
    Gordons Elderflower Spritz Bottle 500mL 1015 242
    UDL Vodka & Raspberry Cans 375mL 971 232
    Smirnoff Raspberry Sorbet Pouch 250mL 955 228
    Ciders
    James Squire Orchard Crush Apple Cider 500mL 875 209
    Somersby Apple Cider Bottle 330mL 868 207
    Strongbow Classic Apple Cider Bottle 355mL 767 183
    Beer
    Crown Lager Bottle 375mL 641 153
    Victoria Bitter Bottles 375mL 634 151
    James Boag’s Premium Lager 623 149
    Corona Extra Beer 355mL 611 146
    Carlton Draught Stubbies 375mL 581 139
    Wine
    Red wine 12% medium glass 160mL (average all brands) 456 109
    Dry white wine 12% medium glass 160mL (average all brands) 454 108
    Sweet white wine 11% medium glass 160mL (average all brands) 669 160
    Sparkling white wine 11% medium glass 160mL (average all brands) 434 104
    Rose medium glass 11% 160mL (average all brands) 469 112
    Soft drinks
    Cola can 375ml 656 157
    Lemonade 375ml 525 125
    Lemon lime + bitters bottle 375ml 754 180

    (Cancer Council)

    These figures don’t look that high but who stops at one drink on a night out?  Drinks combined with your meal can end up in a high amount of cals/kj’s.

    In case you’re wondering about how red wine is good for us ……  It contains reservatrol, a polyphenol which protects us from diseases such as cancer and heart disease.  This doesn’t mean that you go rushing off buying masses of red wine!  Wine also contains sulphites which some of us are sensitive to.  Darker drinks, such as red wine, bourbon, brandy and whisky, are also generally higher in congeners (by-products of fermentation) than white wine and vodka which can cause a worse hangover.   If you want more of those polyphenols without the hangover, eat more of these foods which have the same amount as a standard glass of red wine.

    24g of walnuts
    25g of dark chocolate
    1.5 apples
    360ml of tea
    158g almonds
    85g blueberries
    270g of cranberries

    By all means, enjoy yourself but if weight loss is your focus, watch those drinks.  A Nutritionist can help with managing your weight and much more.

    I offer a free 15 minute chat by phone or 30 minutes face-to-face if you need help with managing your weight or have any other health concerns.

     

     

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    Healthy Caramel Slice Recipe https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/healthy-caramel-slice-recipe/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/healthy-caramel-slice-recipe/#respond Sat, 02 Jun 2018 19:00:04 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=1385 For many of us, baking is both a therapeutic task and a time to connect with our family. I really enjoy baking with my kids, but constantly baking sugar filled treats is not on the agenda. Which is why I’m ready to share my favourite “Healthy Caramel Slice” recipe. Perfect to cook for the family, […]

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    For many of us, baking is both a therapeutic task and a time to connect with our family. I really enjoy baking with my kids, but constantly baking sugar filled treats is not on the agenda.

    Which is why I’m ready to share my favourite “Healthy Caramel Slice” recipe. Perfect to cook for the family, bring to a friends house, or just cook for yourself.

    Ingredients

    Base

    • 1 cup almond meal
    • 1 cup desiccated coconut
    • 2 tablespoons honey or rice malt syrup
    • 3 tablespoons cacao or cocoa
    • Pinch of salt

    Filing

    • 6 tablespoons cashew butter
    • 1 tablespoon honey or rice malt syrup
    • 3 tablespoons maple syrup
    • 4 tablespoons coconut oil
    • 3 tablespoons coconut cream
    • 1/2 teaspoon concentrated natural vanilla extract
    • pinch of salt

    Top

    • 80 grams of dark chocolate, melted

    or

    • 1 rounded tablespoon almond butter
    • 1 rounded tablespoon honey or rice malt syrup
    • 3 tablespoons coconut oil
    • 3 tablespoons cacao or cocoa

    Method

    Line a square 20cm tin with baking paper overhanging the sides for easy removal.

    Place the base ingredients into your processor and blend at high speed until the mixture resembles a fine, sticky crumb. Press the mixture firmly into the base of your prepared tin and place into the fridge while you make the middle layer.

    Place the ingredients for the middle layer into your processor and blend at medium speed until the mixture is smooth and well combined. Try to avoid over blending.

    Pour the mixture over your base and place in the fridge to set.

    Once set top the slice with the melted chocolate. Or, place the ingredients for the homemade chocolate into your processor and blend at medium speed until smooth and well combined. Cover the top of your slice with the chocolate and place into the fridge to set.

    Slice. Serve. Eat and enjoy!

    Note

    Once sliced this can be stored and served straight from the fridge or freezer, it will not be stable at room temperature.

     

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    Try These Snack Swaps https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/try-these-snack-swaps/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/try-these-snack-swaps/#respond Thu, 17 May 2018 04:40:54 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=120472 We are all guilty of snacking, and even over-snacking. But if you are trying to stick to gut healthy foods that work for your body and minimising your intake of processed foods, then snacking may be something you need to tackle. I’ve heard the concern raised many times and while snacking comes down to a […]

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    We are all guilty of snacking, and even over-snacking. But if you are trying to stick to gut healthy foods that work for your body and minimising your intake of processed foods, then snacking may be something you need to tackle.

    I’ve heard the concern raised many times and while snacking comes down to a bit of self- control, if you implement the below snack swaps when you need, you will notice the difference. These are snack swaps full of foods we all have around but tend to skip when we go to the fridge for a 3pm treat. Having these in mind at those moments of weakness as well as during the grocery shopping trip is important.

    Try These Snack Swaps

    Swap potato chips for sliced capsicum & celery

    Swap fries for sliced baked sweet potato rounds

    Swap ice-cream for natural yogurt with a few strawberries

    Swap cheesey snacks for homemade guacamole & sliced vegetables

    Swap your chocolate treat for homemade trail mix with unsalted nuts, sunflower seeds and mini dark chocolate chips (dried fruit in store bought trail mix is quite high in sugar)

    Swap fruit juice for fruit infused water

    Swap lollies for one piece of fruit or a smoothie (like this one here)


    If you make any of these snack swaps let me know. Leave a comment or find me on Facebook or Instagram – I love hearing how my recipes and suggestions work for you.

     

     

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    How teenagers can use mobile phones safely https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/how-teenagers-can-use-their-mobile-phone-safely/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/how-teenagers-can-use-their-mobile-phone-safely/#respond Wed, 16 May 2018 06:05:58 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=120485 How teenagers can use mobile phones safely World Health Organisation had classified wireless radiofrequency (RF) as possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B); the same carcinogenicity as asbestos and lead. You can imagine my reaction when my teenage sons got the hand-me-down mobile phone from their step-sister when she upgraded. Mobile phones, Wi-Fi, smart-meter, phone towers […]

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    How teenagers can use mobile phones safely

    World Health Organisation had classified wireless radiofrequency (RF) as possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B); the same carcinogenicity as asbestos and lead. You can imagine my reaction when my teenage sons got the hand-me-down mobile phone from their step-sister when she upgraded. Mobile phones, Wi-Fi, smart-meter, phone towers were some of the sources of wireless radiofrequency.

    With a 200% risk of brain cancer when mobile phones were used directly on one side of the head for >10 years, I immediately set the rule never to put the phones at their heads. They were to use speaker phones or just text.

    Protest, they did. Stretch boundaries, they did. ‘I can’t hear!’

    ‘Tell the person to hold on whilst you go somewhere quiet’, I replied.

    Another excuse, ‘I don’t want others to hear our conversation. It’s private.’

    “Tell the person to hold on whilst you find a private room to talk’, I replied.

    Needless to say, I was furious with their father for adding another disciplinary action to my parenting menu. As if I haven’t got enough to do.

    I’d also been educating families on how to use mobile phones safely. It looked like the time had finally come to put my words into practice. I’d figured that if I can’t do it, why should I ask my clients to do it.

    I considered the easy way out; ban the stupid phones from my house. It didn’t look good for Mum to take away a fun gadget given by Dad. Besides, they’ll use it instead at their Dad’s house anyway. I cringed every time I saw students stick their phone on their heads during school pick up. Imagining my boys doing just that at their father’s house hit my zero tolerance level. Children’s skulls are thinner than adults’. Their brain and skull cavity contain more water compared to an adults. Radiofrequencies are attracted to water and can radiate through at a higher percentage of child’s skull than an adult’s.

    The mobile industry was never required to prove that radiofrequencies were safe to use prior to sale. Like our history with asbestos, we and our children are guinea pigs to this live health experiment with radiofrequency. Health effects are brain tumour, acoustic neuroma, electrical hypersensitivity etc. Until such time when wireless radiofrequency is proven safe and healthy to use by researchers with ‘no conflict in interest’, I will be practicing the precautionary approach for my family in the meantime. Even countries such as China, France, Germany, Austria, Sweden and Russia are practicing the precautionary principle by lowering the RF exposure standards way below the international standards set by ICNIRP.

    I considered my teens’ future. Like now, it may be a requirement for them to use a mobile phone for their work. Men usually store their mobile phones in their pants , belt or shirt pockets. I didn’t want to talk about sperm with my boys, but after catching them with their phones in their pockets repeatedly, I finally vented about their penises and sperm being microwaved. Yep, like the microwave in their Dad’s kitchen. I told them that research has shown that RF damages DNA sperm and makes them swim funny. Geez. I was embarrassed later, when I realised what I had said, after I had calmed down. It worked though. Now, whenever I see them take their phones out from their pants or jackets, a wave of guilt ripple over their faces and then they’ll quickly reassure me that they’d switched the phone to air-plane mode. Or they promised to remember to put it in their school bag the next time.

    Sigh.

    I get the feeling that my sons think that they were invincible, like Superman. They were too young to care about their sperm health or their future kids. They cared about what happens to their penis though, since they can see it. They can’t see sperm, their future kids nor RF. And herein lies the problem. You can’t see RF and most of us can’t feel it, bar the individuals who have developed electrical hypersensitivity from RF exposure. Sweden shields homes of people suffering from electrical hypersensitive for free. RF shielding costs thousands of dollars per home.

    I finally arrived at a conclusion that education was the only way to move forward. The mobile phone had integrated itself fully into my teenagers’ daily lives and there was no turning back. So the continual use of the mobile phone in my house came with certain conditions. I do acknowledge the frustration of having to explain the ‘why’ and remind them a thousand times but I suppose that’s a given with parenting. Suffice to say, the messages did eventually sink in into their thin skulls.

    1. Text rather than ring someone
    2. If you absolutely have to call someone in an emergency, then
      1. Use speaker phone 50cm away from head. Keep calls short.
      2. Use ear phones, preferably air filled tubes.
    3. Store phone in school bag on the furtherest pocket away from body.
    4. Don’t store phone in belts, pocket jacket or pants. If there’s absolutely no choice, turn it off or put it on air-plane mode. Check messages at every hour.
    5. Don’t recharge mobile phones in bedroom.
    6. Put mobile phone 2m away from sleeping area, air-plane mode. The kitchen bench is where they’re ‘meant’ to put their devices at night before bed.
    7. If I had teenage girls, I’d advise them not to put their mobile phones in their bra.

    Please note that radiofrequencies and electromagnetic fields are often used interchangeably.

    For more information on how Mary Leet, The Healthy Home Scientist can help you map the RF in your home, call 0433 646 944, email info@theHealthyHomeScientist.com or visit www.theHealthyHomeScientist.com.

    (Agarwal et al, 2008; Agarwal et al, 2009; Wdowiak et al, 2007; De Iuliis et al, 2009; Fejes et al, 2005; Aitken et al, 2005; Kumar, 2012; Bio-Initiative Report, 2007)

     

     

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    How the online world is affecting our health https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/how-the-online-world-is-affecting-our-health/ https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/how-the-online-world-is-affecting-our-health/#respond Wed, 16 May 2018 05:57:23 +0000 https://www.wholefoodnutrition.com.au/?p=120478 How the online world is affecting our health You might think that health and well-being is all about diet.  It is up to a point but our lifestyles are equally important.  For us to eat well, we need to feel stable and calm.  If we’re super stressed or if we’re catching up with social media […]

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    How the online world is affecting our health

    You might think that health and well-being is all about diet.  It is up to a point but our lifestyles are equally important.  For us to eat well, we need to feel stable and calm.  If we’re super stressed or if we’re catching up with social media all the time, we don’t have time to plan and think about what we’re eating.  Planning is the key to healthy eating.  Being emotionally stable is also key to healthy eating.  You know that feeling when it gets to late afternoon and you eat because you’re really tired/stressed or bored.  Or you’ve had a bad day at work and you reach for the block of chocolate or a couple of glasses of wine when you get home.  We’re creatures of habit so we eat what we’ve always eaten because we feel good.  But what if those foods aren’t serving us well?  We start to feel unwell.  I’ve been there.  I couldn’t imagine my life without bread and pasta but I knew I felt better by reducing these foods.  To make changes, we have to be ready, we have to want to make changes and we have to be less stressed.

    DISTRACTION – for me, this word sums up 2018.  We’re distracted with everything online – social media, emails, messaging and gaming for some.  Everywhere we go, people have their heads buried in their smart phones.  People are talking less and less to each other.  In the UK, recent research indicates that loneliness may be the next biggest public health issue on par with obesity and substance abuse.  Changes in modern society are considered to be the cause and one of the reasons is our growing reliance on social technology rather than face to face interaction.  It means we feel less connected to others and our relationships are becoming more superficial and less rewarding (Dr Rebecca Harris 2015).

    Nutrition

    So what has all this got to do with nutrition or health?  When we’re not distracted, we’re more mindful.  This means sitting down at a table and focusing on what we’re actually eating.  It also means focusing on chewing our food well.  When we’re eating on the go or eating checking emails, we’re not nourishing our mind and body.  Our digestive system doesn’t work well under these conditions.  It works well when we eat slowly, when we’re not stressed, when we’re not in a rush and we’re not distracted with technology.

    Going ‘screen free’

    Recently, I’ve been emerging now and then from the online world and the stress of each day and practising mindfulness.  ‘What am I doing?’ and ‘Who am I?’ are a few of the questions I ask myself.   I finally realized that my family is driven by technology and losing the art of communication.  Where there’s technology, there are wires, lights, boxes, flashing lights, iPad’s pinging, you get the idea.  We can’t escape!  Sometimes my 13 year old forgets to eat when he is so engrossed in a video game.  I decided we had to do something about it.   We now have two ‘screen free’ Sundays each month where each person chooses what we do.  So far, it’s working really well and I even get to have a proper conversation with my 13 year old!  I have to admit, even I found it hard at first as I had become so reliant on checking my ‘screens’.

    I have a love/hate relationship with the online world.  Who doesn’t like being connected, finding out information immediately and seeing what my friends are doing on the other side of the world.  But there’s a dark side.  A group of tech experts who used to work at companies like Facebook have founded an organization to raise awareness about what they believe are the negative effects of social media and technology on society.  They starting a campaign called The Truth About Tech and are especially worried about the effects of unchecked tech use and social media on children.  This is a step in the right direction.

    Next time you reach for your ‘screen’, look up at the sky, observe the trees or listen to the birds.  Let me know if you feel any different.

    If you’d like to find out more ideas on how to have ‘screen free’ days, head over to my Facebook page (link at top of website).

     

     

     

     

     

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